Episode #66: The Psychology of Sales with Coach George Wang

Jan 12, 2022
Limitless Entrepreneur Podcast Episode 66 The Psychology of Sales with Coach George Wang

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This week on the podcast sales coach and NLP practitioner Coach George Wang is doing a deep dive for us on human psychology as it relates to sales. George helps entrepreneurs, business owners, and corporate executives to connect with, market to, sell, and serve their customers in an ethical manner using psychological behavioral principles and authentic sales processes. If you're listening to this you are likely selling a product or service online, and George is breaking down how we can use psychology to better understand our clients and communicate our value to them.


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Read the full transcript below: 

Nicole Laino 

Hello, and welcome to the Limitless Entrepreneur Podcast. I'm your host, Nicole Laino. And I am here with a special guest today. I'm here with George Wang. George, how are you?

 

George Wang 

Hey, Nicole, thank you for having me so much on your show. And thank you for you know, the opportunity and I want to thank your community as well for allowing me to be here. I'm doing absolutely great. It's a beautiful day. It's sunny here in California. And I think I heard a quote once that said, Any day when I wake up and the ground is beneath me, and not above me is a good day.

 

Nicole Laino 

It's just the truth. So tell the listeners a little bit about you. I know that you're an NLP coach, you are like, tell tell them a little bit about you.

 

George Wang 

Sure. So my name is Coach George Wang. And correct, I'm an NLP coach and sales trainer. I wasn't always like that though. I started my life like any normal, you know, 14, 15 year old kid growing up in the 90s, right, playing Nintendo 64, you know, playing GoldenEye, and you know shooting basketball with friends. And then I had an event happened to me, I had a few things happen to me, I had a kidney disease. Diagnosed with kidney disease, which eventually led to them finding a tumor on my lung. And when they found this tumor on my lung, the doctors immediately said, I just needed to get it cut out. So I went to the ER actually with what I thought was a stomachache. But it turned out to be something called renal thrombosis, which is a blood clot coming out of the left kidney going into the lung, separate from the kidney disease I had. But while they were searching for that they found the tumor on my lung. So I went in, I can’t remember what day it was, around August 15, August 16 1998. And on September 1, I had my surgery and had my lung removed. Interesting happened during that time period, though, there was just so much love outpouring from all of my friends, people came to visit me every single day. Maybe it's because they got to cut school and come to the hospital, like I don't know. But either way I felt the love. But what happened during that time period, is something snapped in my brain. I felt during that time period that the meaning of life is based off of the human connections that we make. And so because of that, I just became obsessed during that time with human behavior. So starting when I was 19, I'm 38 now, so the past 19 years I started studying NLP which is Neuro Linguistic Programming, started studying hypnosis, hypnotherapy, you know, I certified in both. On my own I started studying CBT, Gestalt therapy and every kind of human behavioral science I could get my hands on, I wanted to learn about it, so that I could learn about people in general. And that led me to a very, very good, very strong sales career, because I learned that with that knowledge, with that tool, I could help a lot of people get things that they have a block around getting. And I think that's a big thing. People feel like salespeople are bad and sales people are evil, and I don't believe that's true. You know, yeah, there are some bad apples. Sure, right, who are looking out for just their commission. But there's bad people in everything, there's bad people in the supplement industry, who are selling you snake oil. So I really believe that part of the job of a salesperson was to help people get past whatever block that they have to getting something–some product that is actually going to really help out their lives. Which is why I do believe also, if you are going to be in the profession of sales, you're going to be an entrepreneur selling your own product, you’d better damn well really believe in what you sell, and really sell a good product.

 

Nicole Laino 

I always say you can't sell what you don't believe in. So the belief has to come first. Yeah, what is it, and I completely agree with everything that you said, and I also am an NLP practitioner. And so I, we can we can dive on that in a little bit. But I'm curious, what is it that you find in working with people, with entrepreneurs, what do you find is normally the biggest block? Is there one thing that that or a group of things that you are normally honing in on or can say like, you've seen a pattern?

 

George Wang 

Yeah. So I think what people say and where it stems from are two different things. And I think that the most common thing I hear is that people don't want to come off as being pushy. Yeah. Especially when it comes around handling objections, right? They don't want to come off as pushy. Sometimes you hear the word sleazy, but pushy is the word that I hear the most often. And I think that stems from this belief system that entrepreneurship sometimes, especially sales, is like evil or bad for some reason. And I think that's perpetuated by like our media, right? Like if you watch any movie out in the world, almost any movie you watch, the bad guy at like the top is always some evil corporation or some rich guy looking to make a buck. Doesn't matter. Almost everything, unless it's about like a serial murderer or something psychotic like that, like it's almost always some rich guy, right? And so I think it perpetuates this thing about asking for money. So I think people say pushy, but I think it stems from an even deeper belief of not feeling good or not feeling comfortable about asking for money, because there's some inherent belief, maybe, that money is evil or something like that.

 

Nicole Laino 

Yes, I agree with that. The other thing that that comes up when just as you were saying that I think people have a general problem with asking for lots of things. I think most of us have trouble, like, that was something I uncovered in myself, when I looked at what hurdles I had to overcome to be able to sell more comfortably. And I like to look at like, I'm a provider, I provide a service, rather than using you know, if it helps you to not use the word of “sell”. But I had trouble asking, I had trouble putting myself in that position of feeling like, and I think it came from also a deeper sense of feeling like people don't support me. So I don't feel supported. So I don't feel comfortable asking because if I don't ask they can't say no. And that's what I know that they're going to do. That there was this thought pattern that was happening. Do you see any of that with the people that you work with? Or does that ring true?

 

George Wang 

Oh, 100%, I think it's because we have this, like, superhero complex, here in the Western world where we're supposed to be able to handle it all. And it's pervasive in our society, right, people are scared to ask for a couple reasons, I think at least I think one is they think they should be able to do it on their own. And I think in the context of sales and selling a product is that they, you know, they think that they shouldn't have to ask sometimes, right? Like, they think that the person should just want to buy, but the person has no idea what you do or anything like that, how is a person going to make a decision unless you help them to make that decision?

 

Nicole Laino 

And it is sort of like a passive aggressive sort of way of going about and looking at the world that, you know, I shouldn't have to ask. But why is it a problem to ask? I find that with people, I was just talking with my coaching group yesterday about the importance of making offers. Like, you have to make offers. Like, “people know what I do”, do they? Yeah, how do you know that? Right? Are they beating down your door? Right? Why won't you make an offer? And because then we get to the fear if you're resistant to it. Okay, so if they know then what's the big deal about you making an offer? And we have to get to those things. So where do you start with people? Tell us a little bit about who comes to you and what issues they're dealing with, and how you start working with them? Where do you start with somebody that's having an issue with sales, they want to improve their sales skills from a mindset perspective, because I think that people think they're going to get like a sales script. Right? When they hire a sales coach, where do you start with people?

 

George Wang 

So when people come to me normally, it's because they have some specific issue. And I want to say like, 75% of the time, they say it's objections. They say I don’t know how to handle objections, they almost always come to me and say, I don't know how to handle objections. And then I have to backtrack that a little bit, right? Because then we have to start well, why? Like, what is it about? And that's when the “I don't want to come off as pushy”. So just like you're saying, we have to start with the mindset piece, right? And so I break down how to like, create sales and create a good sales process with my 30 steps, right? The first step is you have to understand the psychology of sales. But that includes your own psychology, as well as the psychology of the customer. The second part is then you have to build a process around these factors. And then the third part is you have to have some type of feedback loop, whether it's somebody to roleplay with or asking your customers for feedback or looking at your sales numbers to get feedback, right, or a dashboard. If you have a large organization, I've consulted with some, you know, quite a few startups here in Silicon Valley, then we’re always looking at dashboards to see what the feedback is. But you have to have a feedback loop. So we always start with the psychology part and the first part is the mindset of the entrepreneur because if they're normally scared to try to overcome objections, or they don't want to feel pushy, it's normally some type of internal mental block. And it's the fact that I think that, like, just like you're saying, they don't want to ask, they don't want to come off as pushy. And I always tell them like I always try to make some type of reference. For instance, I might say to somebody something like, imagine you are not a plumber. Let's assume that person is not a plumber. And I'll say, your toilet breaks, your whole house smells like crap. And the plumber comes over and he says, Oh, it's 200 bucks and you say, No thanks. And then the plumber goes and walks off, like whose lives are better? Like, whose lives have been elevated because you said no and the plumber just walked off, like nobody, right? Like the plumber now is gonna go home spending an hour's time looking at your toilet, and they go home and they can't feed their family or can't provide and add to their children's college funds. And you still have a stinking toilet, right? Like, no one's better. But if the plumber maybe helped you a little bit in that process, told you why it's not good to have a stinking toilet, I hope we would know it's not good, but if he explains some of the reasons why maybe fecal matter starts to like, whatever, like sprang into the, this is going TMI here, right? But it starts to float around your house. Like, that's some bad stuff that's going in your house. And now what happens if you do decide to pay him the 200 bucks, like, both of your lives are elevated, like now he's able to go home and feed his family, he's able to contribute to his child's education fund, as well as you're now able to have a nice, clean, fresh smelling home. So I think people have to understand that when you do create a sale, and sometimes you have to overcome an objection or two to make that happen but when you do, if you sell a good product that's really helping people in the world, and I believe most people do, right? Like, even a plumber, they all sell great products that help us, both lives are elevated. And that's how we as a society get better, right? That's how we as a society grow, because we're all collectively helping each other through this exchange of energy that we just happen to call money.

 

Nicole Laino 

Yeah, and I think that that's, that's important when we spend and when we–the way that you spend money, the type of customer you are is going to help you in your sales process, or hurt you depending on which way you fall on that. Like I always, I'm always looking at the way that I behave, to see if it's mirroring something I'm experiencing in my sales process or something I'm experiencing with my prospects and customers and clients that I'm working with. Because you know, am I doing what I'm struggling with? Am I being an example of that? And one of those things that always comes up for me is, am I being really stingy with my money? Or am I seeing it as contributing to the greater economy? Am I seeing it as contributing to, you know, like you said, like, feeding the–you know, we had our sprinklers fixed, it's not something that I was excited about fixing, sprinklers are not a sexy thing to spend like a grand on. But it was like, but this guy's, you know, that's what he charges and he did a good job. And he's going to go home, and it's going to go back into, like the local economy. And when you think about it that way, it changes your relationship to the sale.

 

George Wang 

Right, I agree. And they can do it so much better than you can. Somewhere I paid somebody, I think 300 bucks I think to pull the weeds out of my backyard. He literally did it in like 45 minutes. I was like, Well, I just paid this guy 250 to do something in 45 minutes. But I thought about it like I'm in my front yard sometimes doing that it takes me like 30 minutes to pull one weed. 

 

Nicole Laino 

Well, and what's your time worth? I think it comes down to that, you know, would you charge more than that yourself for the work that you do? Yes, then it's worth hiring somebody else. So talk to us a little bit about the psychology of sales. And so these kind of three steps that you take people through. So the psychology of sales for you, and for the buyer. Now, what's the buyer psychology of sales.

 

George Wang 

So I guess we have to start with the overall picture, right? Because when I talk about the psychology of sales, I talk about trying to understand what the buyer’s psychology is. And we do that in lots of ways, working through one on one with clients and I’m coming up with a course right now to teach some of that. But what happens is, when people come off as pushy in their sales process, it's because normally, they're trying to push their reasons for wanting something onto the buyer. Because as an NLP practitioner, you know that we all have our own set of filters, right? Like I have a set of filters, you have a set of filters, our filters are not the same. Because we're both in the same industry and we seem to get along, ours might be semi similar, right? But no two peoples’ are going to be the same. So what happens is people come off pushy, when you as the entrepreneur, you as a salesperson, know your own product, you know why you think it's healthy, or good or beneficial for the person, you know why it's a value to you. And then you try to push that value system onto the customer, onto the prospect, and maybe that's not what's valuable to them. Or maybe that's not how they would choose to describe that value. So the first thing you have to do is understand well what is their value system? Right? What do they believe about whatever it is that they're trying to accomplish, like, what are the specific words that they use, because what one word means to me might not mean to the other person. And so understanding that and then selling to them based off of why they want it, is how you break through that psychological barrier. And then you don't feel like you're being pushy, because you're talking about what they care about, and not what you care about.

 

Nicole Laino 

How it relates to them, how it helps them, how it serves them. And, you know, like, the simplest way or someone might be saying, well, how do I do that? Well, you ask questions, would be my guess what you advise people to do there. And that's, I've caught my own clients doing this too where they have a sales call, they have a sales meeting, they have somebody that they're meeting with, and they want to know what they should say. And it's, it's actually, what should you ask? You should do very little talking in a sales conversation, you should be like 20% of the conversation, the rest of it should be them talking to you and telling you what's important to them. And then you offering them something, or not, maybe you aren't, maybe your solution, like I go into every sales conversation truly, with the and this shifted my energy with it, where it's we're going to sit down, we're going to talk, and I'm going to see if what I do is a good fit for you. If it isn't, I will tell you that, and I won't pitch you. And I'll just, maybe I'll refer somebody or maybe I'll just wish you well. But I don't I don't push anything on anyone. And it's made it where I have, I don't sweat about sales conversations anymore. I used to. I used to because you felt like you were going to get it wrong. Which I think is just a huge fear that many people have. It's just I'll get it wrong. And then I missed my chance. If I miss this chance, then what? Then they put all this meaning on what that one conversation will mean.

 

George Wang 

I mean, that's why the discovery process, you know, I say that every sales call has to be broken down into, it doesn't matter if you do a multiple call process or if it's a one call process. But each individual call and the process as a whole has to be broken down in three steps. The first step is always discovery. And that's when you're literally just asking questions and learning about the person and learning about their goals, what they're trying to move towards, what they're trying to move away from. And you always have to start there first. Because without doing the proper discovery, you haven't earned the right to pitch your product. But then you can go to the second step when you actually do pitch. And maybe you do talk a little bit more, but you do want to be asking questions primarily. And then you have to go to the third step is the actual close. And I love what you say about asking questions, actually, because I use this analogy. This analogy I always use for this. You ever watch Law and Order? Yes. You know, you watch the old school ones, like the Jack McCoy when he left the courtroom. So like the way I was trying to explain the sales process is–picture it like a courtroom. And, you know, a courtroom has the witness, the jury, the judge and the attorney, right? So you as the salesperson and you as the entrepreneur, you're like Jack McCoy, you're the attorney, right? The attorney never says anything, tells anything, they ask questions. And the customer you have in front of you, is the witness. So you're asking questions, and you're trying to get the customer in front of you to tell a story. And then their brain is the judge and the jury. And then through this cycle, that's how you get them to realize or not whether or not your product is right for them or not, because their own judge or jury will decide for them. And that's the analogy I always like to use. When I really think about selling.

 

Nicole Laino 

I think that helps. I think that helps to kind of understand what your role is in this whole thing. Because I think we get confused that we should be like, you're on a stage and you're delivering this pitch the whole time. Like, okay, I'm going to pitch. And that's not, it's not a recipe for a lot of closing, right? There are certain things that are set up that way, if you're giving a presentation, that's a different story. But to be doing it in a meeting and doing it in a sales call? It's about asking the right questions. It's about understanding that person better and whether you can really help them and going into it, you know, there's sort of this presumption that you are the right one for them. If you go into it just waiting to close, and you're not listening. And who the hell are you? You don't know if you're right for them yet. If you haven't spoken to them yet, right? You need to find out more so going with that energy, and people will feel that.

 

George Wang 

I agree 100%, they think they'll always feel that authenticity that you care more about their end result than lining your pocket. You've got to do both, right, because you can't survive without a profit, obviously, but at the same time, you want to make sure that they understand that your primary concern is that they're gonna win more, right? Like they're gonna be the bigger winner in this scenario than you. And that's normally true, right? Like, I'll charge what I charge for sales training. But they'll use that knowledge and make infinitely more money with it than I will just for the time that I work with them, right, so they'll always win more. 

 

Nicole Laino 

So, talk to me about the feedback loop, because the people who are listening may or may not understand exactly what you mean by the feedback loop, what is the feedback loop?

 

George Wang 

So a feedback loop can be a few different things like, how you how you actually implement it. But it's some way to learn if what you're doing is working or not, and how to get better at it. I think when people are selling, especially in a one on one capacity, obviously, your closing ratio, how often you're selling is a great feedback loop number one, but you also want to get better, right? You want to increase that closing percentage as well. And so in order to do that, I think the best thing to have is have some type of roleplay partner, somebody that you can practice with. You know, I have a client who, he just practices with his wife all the time, right? He'll just say, “Hey, honey, like, George taught me this today. And I want to try this”, and he'll practice with his wife, you know? And then she'll say what she liked or didn't like, and I’ll tell him to try with some other people too, but you need some type of feedback loop. So that's definitely one way to do it. And the other way is also to just look at your numbers, right? Because that'll tell you, and that's actually why I like some type of money back guarantee. I know some people like them, and some people don't, depending on the type of product you sell, but the reason I like money back guarantees, I call it a risk reversal. Is because then you have real world feedback, right? Like if one person returns something, then that's probably them and not you. But if you see multiple people returning something, and they're telling us for the same reason, maybe you got to look at your product, and maybe you’ve got to look at your offering and tweak it a little bit. 

 

Nicole Laino 

Yeah. And it's important to be doing that to just kind of be looking at data. You know, data is important, but I love that you bring up having a roleplay partner, and actually playing this out with somebody where you can ask them questions about what their experience was like. How did I seem? How did I make you feel? Did you, were you believing me? Was this intriguing? What was missing? Would you have bought it? Like, those simple questions. And do you recommend people ask people the same questions so that it's like apples to apples comparisons? Do you teach a script? Or do you teach more of like, an energy and, you know, kind of a loose outline of how a sales call should go?

 

George Wang 

Kind of both? So I do have a very specific discovery framework that I use for discovery. And I do teach very specific ways to handle certain objections. I'm not necessarily scripted, per se, but they’re half scripted, I guess, right? It's kind of fill in the blanks with some of the stuff. But then I also talk a lot about the energy as well, right? Like, how you're energetically coming off in your sales presentation in your sales process. Because you want to take people on a journey. So for instance, like, you know, during the discovery process, and I'm using some NLP terms, I know you're trained, but I’ll also explain what they are, right? So the listeners will know. So there's a concept called pacing and leading, right? Pacing is where you're matching the customer's energy or whoever you're talking to. And what happens is, after you pace somebody for a little while, that's what builds rapport, right? Because people build rapport with people, they connect with people they feel similar to, it's not actually based off of interests. Because there's a lot of people who get, like I get along great with this friend of mine, and we're on complete opposite sides politically, complete opposites on a lot of things. We, I'm a Yankee fan, he's an A’s fan, like we're very opposite on a lot of things. But we get along great because energetically, right, we're the same. And so that's us pacing each other. And then after you've paced somebody for a while, you're allowed to do what's called leading them, meaning if you're doing something, you can lead them to an energetic state you want them to go to. If you if you're listening out there, and you want to try this. If coffee shops are open in your area, sit within eyes view of some, we used to do this to my friends, sit within eyeshot view of somebody you don't know. And every time they pick up, and make sure they can kind of see you from the corner of their eye. And every time they pick up their drink to drink something, you pick up your drink, and do it over and over and over again. And then one time instead of following them, you do it first, you pick up your drink, and then see if they'll pick up their drink. Right? And it'll happen a good amount of times when they'll all of a sudden just follow your lead, which is the leading part. So, during the discovery process and the initial rapport building when you first start your sales call, that's when you want to be in full pace mode. Because, you know, you've ever been in like, this tired state and then you get on a meeting or get on a sales call and the person's like, “Hey everybody how are you doing?” And you're like, I'm not in the mood for this, right? Like, this is not where I'm at right now.

 

Nicole Laino 

We're not in the same place right now. 

 

George Wang 

Exactly, exactly. So, during the rapport and the discovery phase, you want to go to wherever they are, right? If they're in low energy, you're at the low energy state. Whatever rate of speech they're using, that's the rate of speech you use, and then you're going to pace them energetically during the entire discovery and rapport building process, then once you've done the discovery, and you're connecting with them, then you've kind of earned the right to now pitch a product, because you found that they are the right customer for you, you can actually help them and you've been pacing them for a while. So you've probably built a little bit of rapport with them. And when you go into presentation, that's when you can begin to lead. And that's when you can up your energy level a little bit because you want them to feel the same energy for your product, or your service that you feel for it. And that's when you're going to raise your energy level up a bit. And then you go for the initial close. And then when you get to the closing portion, that's when you kind of go back and forth. Because whenever they give you an objection, you want to go back down to their level, right, you want to make sure you fully understand, you're empathetic with them, and you understand where they're coming from first. And then when you want to start to talk about why, you know, they should actually purchase your product, because it's beneficial for them, right? Like, why you should not let this objection hold you back from getting a positive result in your life, then you want to lead them a little bit, and then there's kind of this dance back and forth. So to answer your original question, um, yes, sometimes I will have them repeat the same questions or same things with a few people. But I always tell them to ask for feedback and then go to those same people and then try it again a different way. And I think that's why it's sometimes good to have a consistent roleplay partner so they can track your changes along the, you know, along the span or whatever time length you're doing, to get better at this.

 

Nicole Laino 

Now, I love that you said that, because that is important to have some continuity where you know, you're not catching somebody on a bad day, you're not, you know, that’s not some outlier, you didn't do something weird one time, if it's the same person that's kind of evaluating you and giving you some feedback, then they can see the progress and they can let you know when you were you were in this energy. And I remember, I'm actually, I'm a very big Howard Stern fan. And he talked about how, how his like his kind of whole thing, and if you saw private parts, this is in the movie, but that his wife, at the time, not the wife he has now, when he was making the transition from being like a DJ to being who he is now where he talks like himself, and tells his own stories. And he kind of invented that style of radio, that it was his wife, who listened all the time, and always gave him feedback where she was just like, I really liked this one part you did today, where you were just talking about you and he was like, I was just riffing that was actually just she's like, No, no, it was funny, and it felt good, it felt better than all the other stuff that you did, and then ended up being how he went on to become the king of all media. Self proclaimed, but, it does show that the people who know us and the people who have seen us evolve, can give us little clues as to when we're stepping in the right direction.

 

George Wang 

100% 100% I agree with that totally.

 

Nicole Laino 

I love this because, I'm glad that we had this conversation because sales is like I said in the beginning, people think that it's the right pitch. Because people have Facebook ads, where they're, you know, for $37 they'll give you the exact pitch that landed them, you know, $2 million worth of business last month. And they think that there's some sort of magic framework, and while there is a framework that we follow it is much more about what you bring into the sales process. And the the state that you're in when you approach your sales, like we said at the beginning, if you don't believe in what you're selling, you can't sell it.

 

George Wang 

I believe partially like that presentation process in the middle is to transfer the energy and the feeling you have about this product, your belief onto that person. So they can believe it as strongly as you do. Of course you want to make sure that they're believing it for the reasons that they want to believe it for. And you're using, you know, it's their reasons for wanting and not your own specific reasons but you want them to feel your energy because you know you have a good product, right? Like you know what you do is good like, you know, you're a great business coach and you know you can help most people. I know I'm a great sales coach, and I know I can help most people with their sales process. I want them to feel that energy that I have.

 

Nicole Laino 

Yeah, and I love how you put that that it's a transfer of energy somewhere in the middle that you're now transferring this and transitioning over into your love of your product and allowing that to be contagious. After you've taken in all of this information and the other person's energy, but I hope that that kind of gives people a little bit of a visual that, or some sort of a feel of what the sales process can be like and what a successful sales process can be like that you come in with complete and total belief in your product, you come in with energy behind it, knowing that if this person is right, I can help them, I want to hear their story, I want to serve them. And that is my goal with this. And then at the end of it, if it comes out that you can help them that they have a problem, a true problem that you solve, then putting your energy behind serving them, because you can help. They said they wanted a solution, you have it. You are not being pushy, you are being of service.

 

George Wang 

I don't think of it as being pushy, I like to be pull-y like a thing. Right? I like that one, I want to attract people towards me and my energy, and I want my energy for what I do to be almost magnetic. Where you're drawing and you're pulling people in. And then maybe you have to, you know, put your hands down and still help them up over the wall, right, so they can get to your side of the fence, right? But you're using that initial attraction to get them to the wall, and then you kind of help them, prop them over the wall.

 

Nicole Laino 

Yep. And not everybody will be ready, not everybody will be ready to take that leap or take that leap with you. And, you know, you just have to, but I always like to think about it like, I didn't let them off the hook. In the sense that I just, I didn't let my own insecurities or my own fear of being pushy, keep me from giving them the solution they said that they were looking for because they're going to find it someplace else, if they really are in search of a solution, they're going to pay somebody. And if you feel like you're the best person for that job, do you not have a duty to let them know that. And, you know, if you're acting out of integrity, and you're the one to help them, then put your best foot out there and serve this person.

 

George Wang 

I love that you said those two words, duty and integrity, because those are the exact two words that I use. I always say that when someone gives you an objection, and you know your product is good for them, you know and you believe in your product so much that you're the one to actually help them out. Then I also believe that to be an integrity, you've got to do whatever you can to try to help this person, I believe it's your ethical duty to go and try to help this person out. Because if you don't, and you believe you're basically one of the best at this, they might go to somebody else and get a lesser product. They might never get the help, they might be stuck in their problem for years, where if you just maybe would have tried a little bit harder, then maybe they could have came over the wall. Right? And maybe not. Maybe for whatever reason their blocks are so big that they're just not going to come over the wall, at least you know, and you can sleep well at night, knowing that you did everything in your power to at least try to help this person. And if they still say no, that's on them, right? After that.

 

Nicole Laino 

You are a provider, you have a solution. And if they said that they had a problem, and you are the best person to solve that problem for them in your opinion, this is where I think it really helps, you know, the importance of niching. And knowing your ideal client and having an ideal client, I think that this is where it comes up too. Because I know my ideal client when I see it. And there are certain people if you tell me what your problems are, if we go through the discovery process, and I'm like, this is what I do. I feel very much in my power to not push but pull and just let them know that this is exactly what I do. This is what I help people with, this is my superpower, if you are truly looking for a solution to it, I believe I’m it. And when I didn't have as, you know, firm a grip on who my niche was and I was more broad with it I questioned that more. Now I look at it and I'm like, nope, I know her when I see her, or I know him when I see him. Like you start talking to me, you tell me what your issues are. There are certain things like if you start talking to me about you know, you want full automation on I'm like, I'm not your person. That's not what I do. But if you're looking for a certain type of transformation, I'm like, I can help you there. So, so much of it, I think is knowing yourself, having that belief and that just solidifies the belief that you have in your product.

 

George Wang 

I agree wholly. And another thing about you know, knowing your niche is you get to work with people you actually like. You know, when you don't have a niche you just end up working with anybody and you might not actually like doing that job.

 

Nicole Laino 

Yeah, no, and it's like you get to choose. Yeah, you get to pick who you work with. And the better you are at speaking to that person, then you're calling out, you know, you're sending out the right signal. They're, they're responding. And you're working with your dream client all the time. 

 

George Wang 

Absolutely. I love it.

 

Nicole Laino 

Well, I love this. I love this conversation. And you know, I just, I think you're wonderful. And I appreciate you coming on. Is there anything else that you would, I'd love for you to tell everybody where they can stay in touch with you? But is there anything you wanted to leave the listeners with? Before we sign off. 

 

George Wang 

Yeah, I think, you know, it's kind of the whole theme of what I've been saying in the very beginning. If you have a product out there, and you believe it's good for somebody, and it's ethical, and it's going to help people in the world, it is your ethical duty, I believe, at least to get it out into the world. Because that's how we as a society grow. That's how we as society get better. Could you imagine if Ford decided to not sell the Model T? Where would we be today? Would we have cars today? I don't know. Would we be 50 years off? I don't know. Imagine that Elon Musk right now was not deciding to try to sell the Tesla. Would we use up every fossil fuel? And we probably will anyway, I don't I think are going regardless. But well, we have a solution for after they're gone. Right? Maybe not right? So he's trying to do things to make the world a better place. But in order to do that, he has to sell the Tesla's because I forgot what year it was 2014 I can't remember when it was I know it was right before the model three came out. Tesla almost went bankrupt. Yeah. And in order for them to not go bankrupt, what do you have to do? Sell cars. And now we might have a greener future because of that, or at least one where we have an ultimate solution when we run out of fossil fuels. Yep. So I believe it's really your ethical duty to go out and get your product, get your service out into the world and help as many people as you possibly can.

 

Nicole Laino 

I love that. I couldn't agree more. And tell everybody where they can stay in touch with you and learn more about you if they want to if they want to continue following you.

 

George Wang 

Yeah, absolutely. So there's two places. One of them is my podcast, which you can just open up into, you're probably on your podcast app right now. You can open that up. The podcast is called Money, Love And Freedom. So you can just search Money, Love And Freedom. And you'll find me there. And the best way to get in contact with me is on Instagram. I love having conversations with people there. So if you want to reach me there, you can find me @coachGeorgeWang, just one word. So it's Coach George Wang. 

 

Nicole Laino 

We will link all of that up in the show notes to make it super easy for you. So you don't have to worry about it. If you didn't, weren't able to write all of that down. We've got you covered, just hop on over to the Show page and we will link you up there you can be transported over to all the places that George just mentioned. Thank you so much for being here. George, this was such a pleasure to have you on the show. And thank you listener if you made it all the way to the end of this episode. I appreciate you. I appreciate you for being here always and for you being here now. So just remember, you are only limited by the limitations that you accept. And when you stop accepting those limitations. That is when you become limitless. I will see you on the next episode. Until then.

 

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